CTE Study

Discussion in 'Football Central' started by Choctaw_fan, Jul 27, 2017.

  1. Choctaw_fan

    Choctaw_fan Well-Known Member
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    If only the brains of people with possible symptoms of CTE are studied after their deaths, wouldn't you expect 99% to have CTE? DUH!

    Has anyone looked at brains of football players who did not commit suicide or die young for strange illnesses? I'm not a big NFL fan but I don't think results are worth the paper they were written on. The data is skewed. Hope the NFL figures this out before Congress bans football in the US.
     
    1 Choctaw_fan, Jul 27, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
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  2. Football941

    Football941 Well-Known Member
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    You are providing a study of one of the smallest of percentages of the people who play this game. The game in which these are the largest of human beings being paid to run into each other at high speeds. The better you entertain the more money you receive. They are told by others if you say you are hurt you will not get a contract.
    The carrot is out on the stick dangling for you if you want it and if you don't there are 30 other guys that will do it.
     
  3. Silver King

    Silver King Well-Known Member
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    Yes that occurred to me, the sample was flawed, plus with the law suites and stuff. But I shared that article when it came out few days ago with the guy who started next to me for four years (in the lowest division of football) the NAIA, because we both had some bad ones. He chuckled like it was only in the pros (He's a mess; Six back and two shoulder surgeries. He's been managing pain for years).

    We played in a different era - 941 is right about the NFL, but that doesn't stop there; you never let someone get a chance of taking your spot because you're hurt or getting treatment. Back then OL couldn't use hands. From junior high on I was taught to lead with my head. I broke cage-style face masks in high school and college.

    I guarantee it effected me. I got one early in a bowl game, knocked out for maybe 5 seconds or so I was told. I played the whole game. Finals were a month later, and I had a bitch of a time studying. Tough concentrating half of the next semester too. That was my soph. season, I got another my Senior year. Gary, the OG next to me had at least 6-8 of them in four years. He hardly left the field either.

    We were a long way from the NFL, but at least one of our teammates committed suicide (25years after), and one of our FBs we know is dead but never heard how - he had a few. My high school teammates at another NAIA school (Bethel College, where my son went) also had a teammate commit suicide 25 years or so afterwards.

    Nobody looks at it all the way back to high school. BUt that may be intentional - I bet it would be pretty scary numbers.
     
    3 Silver King, Jul 27, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2017
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  4. Football941

    Football941 Well-Known Member
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    It is really down to the repeated hits. The longer you play the more the chances are you will have lasting effects.
    Similar to any repeated use injury. Carpal Tunnel comes to mind.
    The way older players were taught versus the younger players of today is much different. A real study will be of players that play now in 20 yrs to see if the new techniques actually work.
    My son and I have talked about different reasons for how he plays and the way he is taught. It made me think about how we did it before and what the benefits can be long term.
     
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